Edinburgh Jazz Festival: International Bands. July 2012.

The one EJF gig that didn’t work for me was the Jeremy Pelt Quintet’s headlining show. It might have been because it was in a tent and there was a lot of spillage from neighbouring gigs; or because it was a windy evening – which, coupled with the tent, caused a lot of interfering flappage; or maybe because the band were jetlagged. Whatever, it didn’t really catch. I don’t think it help that the following first chorus was a long bass solo. It just felt like the show lacked energy.

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I saw the same band the following evening – and it felt like a different band: full of energy this time, they seemed excited to be playing, and that excitement spilled over. Which just goes to show that every band can have an off-night – but that might be the one chance that punters get to see you, and that is all they can go on…

I hadn’t planned to go to the second night of Jeremy Pelt – though I’m glad I did. They were supporting the Bad Plus with Joshua Redman; I was going to see the Bad Plus the following evening and I have been disappointed by previous collaborations with the Bad Plus (their trio work makes for a very high hurdle), but since I had never seen Redman I decided to go along. This was a very good decision: this music played was the most engaging and exciting I had heard for a long time. The Bad Plus have been touring with Redman during the summer, and he fitted in seamlessly – it felt like he had been part of the group for a long time. His presence seemed didn’t inhibit the trio at all, adding more depth. As a quartet they created marvellous music, by turns powerful, moving and humorous. (This video of one number from the gig is typical of their playing.)

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After such a superlative performance, the Bad Plus as a trio the following evening could only be disappointing. Their performance was very good, but it just couldn’t match up. This was not the band’s fault: if I felt pretty drained after the superlative performance of the night before, how must they have felt? Perhaps I shouldn’t have gone to the gig; but then I’d always have felt I was missing out…

There were two gigs which mixed up Scottish and European musicians. First up was Laura MacDonald and Joakim Milder, together with Mattias Stahl on vibes. Stahl stole the show: the two saxophonists played some lovely music, but the vibraphonist stole the show. Without a pianist or drummer, much of the rhythm-duties fell on Stahl’s shoulders.

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Trumpeter Colin Steele and pianist Dave Milligan – one of Scottish jazz’s little known heros – played an all too short duet – just a couple of numbers, which left me feeling a little short changed (Steele and Milligan work very well together!). Before, that is, Enzo Favata and his trio took to the stage and opened the way for something more interesting still. With Danilo Gallo on bass and U. T. Gandhi on drums, the saxophonist lead an energetic exploration of the space between jazz and folk improvisation, with music with its roots in (he said) Sardinia and southern Italy. It got more interesting still when the trio was joined by Steele and Milligan for a full set of exciting jazz. Much of Steele’s music is tinged with folk from the celtic fringes – his big band Stramash is active at the crossroads between jazz and folk – and Milligan has played in many folk settings. Together as a quintet, playing tunes from both their repertoire, they proved music as a universal language: each brought something different, to create an evening that felt unique. Steele and Favata had a natural ease together – their styles, though different, blended superbly. This was exciting because it was unexpected.

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