Tag Archives: Peter Johnstone

“Square One”. Edinburgh, November 2017.

There seems to be a blossoming of young jazz talent in Scotland. Over the past few years, more and more young musicians have been performing in clubs, concert halls, and festivals – graduates and students from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland and alumni of the Tommy Smith Youth Jazz Orchestra (Smith is also professor of the jazz programme at the RCS).

Square One are such a band: bass player David Bowden is the 2017 BBC Young Scottish Jazz Musician of the Year; Peter Johnstone won the same award in 2012, and plays the piano in Tommy Smith’s excellent, current quartet; drummer Stephen Henderson has received rewards and accolades: and Joe Williamson has played with SNJO (TSYJO’s big brother). They all seem to have firest class degrees from the jazz programme at the RSC.

Toegether, they’re a exuberant, lively self-assured quartet playing exciting, engaging music: very enjoyable and a sign that there is another generation coming up fast. Self assured

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Tommy Smith Quartet. Edinburgh Jazz Festival, July 2017.

As opening statements go, it was pretty definitive: a short introduction from Calum Gourlay’s bass and then the whole quartet roared into the Resolution, the second part of John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme”. Many people consider A Love Supreme to be one of the most important pieces of music of the twentieth century – me included. It is a work of passion that communicates a deep spirituality. It is a piece that is rarely played by other musicians, despite it being hugely influential: it seems almost sacrilegious to do so.

So for Tommy Smith and his quartet to start their concert celebrating Coltrane with Resolution, full of energy and passion themselves, controlled and forceful, clearly marked the territory.

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On the hottest night of the year, the theatre was full, and sweltering. On stage, the band wore suits and ties, buttoned up, and kept their high energy approach going the whole time. Like many (most?) tenor players, Smith has long been influenced by Coltrane: as a young artist, he recorded Giant Steps on his first album, and he regularly included numbers by Coltrane in his live sets. He directed, and played tenor (together with Courtney Pine) with, the SNJO playing Coltrane a few years ago. He has an affinity with Coltrane’s music.

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Playing with a line up guaranteed to bring to mind Coltrane’s classic quartet, and on this night apparently playing entirely acoustically (no mikes to be seen – though I’d be surprised if the bass wasn’t miked), Tommy Smith made a glorious sound. The band were superb. Peter Johnstone, a relative youngster, must have been channeling McCoy Tyner, laying down thick chords and searing solos. Sebastiaan de Krom was both light and loud, letting rip enough to do Elvin Jones justice; and Calum Gourlay, in the fourth gig I’d seen him play in four days, just gets better and better.

Smith explained that they were playing music from their latest CD, Embodying the Light – and I think they played the whole thing: three compositions by Smith, five by Coltrane, and ‘Trane’s arrangement of Summertime. It was powerful music – pure Smith, but pure Coltrane too. It was hugely exciting – exhilarating, even. It was a full blown experience, a bit of a roller coaster – aside from Naima, it was all pretty full on – and every bit as exciting. Wonderful stuff.

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